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How long does it take to recover from dehydration?

The time it takes to recover from dehydration depends on how dehydrated you are

 

If you are severely dehydrated, it’s likely that you will be hospitalized and put on intravenous hydration for up to 24 hours to recover from dehydration, or until you’re able to drink oral rehydration fluids yourself.[1] When you’re severely dehydrated, you need to put back a LOT of fluid, and it needs to be balanced with the nutrients that your body usually contains.

If you were to suddenly put a lot of water back into your body after being severely dehydrated, it might cause your body to go into a form of shock, so you need to pace yourself[2]

At less severe dehydration levels that are still serious, it’s possible that you’ll only be drinking oral rehydration fluids.  CDC guidelines for those suffering from dehydration through Cholera recommend drinking up to 1 liter of ORS fluid per hour for an adult, and children 20ml / kg of body weight. [3] Want to learn the fastest way to rehydrate? Read about it here.

 

Dehydration Symptoms: How to tell if you're dehydrated

You are dehydrated when you lose more fluids from your body than are taken in, for example when you have a stomach flu mixed with diarrhea or if you consume alcohol. Dehydration prevents the body from functioning normally, and as a result you can experience symptoms of dehydration. Symptoms of dehydration include:

- Dry mouth

- Dry skin

- Light-headedness

- Urinating less frequently 

- Fatigue

- Sluggishness

- Muscle cramps

- Changes in blood pressure

- Changes in heart rate

- Changes in body temperature

There are different levels of dehydration: mild, moderate and severe dehydration and many more signs that indicate you are dehydrated. If you are experiencing severe symptoms, we recommend seeking medical care immediately.

 

Is your routine dehydrating?

 
Some of us have more dehydrating routines than others, take our quiz to find out if you are meeting your hydration needs daily.

 

 

 

 

  

How long does dehydration last?

 

 

If you don’t treat dehydration by drinking water and in some cases taking on electrolytes in the right quantities, your dehydration will last indefinitely.  

If it progresses for long enough, you can die from dehydration. Most of us know this - you can go weeks without food, but only days without water. New York Times has reported results of a study that showed that 75% of Americans were chronically dehydrated. 

This meant that they were not meeting their daily requirement for water intake, and were staying in a dehydrated state for long periods of time! In that scenario, recovering from dehydration requires a complete overhaul to your routine, to ensure you're making it a daily habit to consume enough water.

 

 

 


 

So what is Hydrant? 

We made Hydrant to be an effective way to recover from dehydration quickly, based on World Health Organization guidelines for oral rehydration solutions. ORS have up to 3x the electrolytes of traditional sports drinks and contain 80% less sugar. 

Drinking enough water each day can be hard for any number of reasons and using Hydrant makes hydration easier. Our oral rehydration solution contains electrolytes like sodium, potassium and magnesium that mimic your body's natural electrolyte makeup. When you lose water from your body, most of the time you also lose electrolytes. If you just replace the water, but not the electrolytes, you further imbalance your body.  To perform at your best throughout the day, it’s best to quickly replenish your body, using a solution that mirrors your biological electrolyte and water balances.

 It's easy to fit into your routine, and many of our customers start their day with a Hydrant to make sure they are at their baseline hydration level from the get-go. Because it’s in a convenient powder pack, wherever you need quick recovery from dehydration, you can mix it with water and get hydrated fast. 

 


Other stories about dehydration

early signs and symptoms of dehydration

dehydration effects: 13 reasons why dehydration is worse than you think

https://www.drinkhydrant.com/blogs/news/dehydration-and-blood-pressure

https://www.drinkhydrant.com/blogs/news/does-dehydration-cause-fatigue

https://www.drinkhydrant.com/blogs/news/causes-of-dehydration

 

 

References:

At Hydrant, we like to go one step further with our references and add some information that gives context to the link. We know that not everyone has the time to comb through an academic article, so give quick summaries next to each link for you! 

 

[1] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC419333/  (This is a meta-analysis of randomized control studies comparing oral rehydration against intravenous rehydration. Randomized control trials are very high quality studies, and meta-analyses look at many of them to draw conclusions.)

 

[2] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMH0082773/  (This link is a long form article titled: "Principles and protocols for intravenous fluid therapy". It's an in depth clinical guide for medical professionals.)

 

[3] https://www.cdc.gov/cholera/treatment/rehydration-therapy.html (CDC page on Oral Rehydration)

 

 

 

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